Dorothy Parker Reads Her Poems And Short Stories

Dorothy Parker, acidic wit of the Algonquin Round Table in 1920s New York, has recently become one of my favourite writers since reading her Collected Short Stories. They’re wonderful snapshots of¬†urban twenties (and beyond) city life, often monologues or dialogues that are painfully honest and fiercely well-observed. People don’t change too much and the characters are still recognisable today.

Here are some clips of her poetry and prose courtesy of the world web.

Dorothy herself reads one of her more disturbing poems, a comedic take on suicide (she was known for her attempts on her own life) Resume:

Here is a reading of probably her most famous story A Telephone Call. It’s something most people at one time or another can relate to.

Anne Hathaway reads from her short story The Garter:

Dorothy wishing for more in One Perfect Rose:

A man with a crazily husky voice reads her funny and painfully true insight of a man afraid of what he did the night before in You Were Perfectly Fine: