Anais Nin Interviewed by Studs Terkel In 1972 And Reading From Her Diary

Legendary bohemian and erotic diarist Anais Nin was interviewed in 1972. Enjoy her ponderings on Swallow Press, Henry Miller, her experimental film-making husband Ian Hugo (a pseudonym) and various other artistic types. Also have a peek at this article containing a film of her reading over spacey electronic music, Bells of Atlantis.

Here she reads from her diary (the version without the rude bits)

A List of Small Press Publishers

Hello! Here’s a few small press publishers for you to explore. Some horror, some bizarro, some literary, stick your face in their sites and see which you prefer. I also advise searching websites Duotrope, Dark MarketsThe Horror Tree and The Erotica Readers and Writers Association, if you like that sort of thing. Some of those below do poetry too. The list isn’t exhaustive, there are plenty more out there.

Raw Dog Screaming (RDSPress) – “fiction that foams at the mouth.”

Burning Bulb Publishing – all kinds of oddities.

The Strange Edge – absurdist, bizarro, weird horror and other oddities. Currently a website but branching out as a magazine

Kraken Press – horror and general darkness

Forbidden Fiction – paying erotica website

Shock Totem Magazine – horror

Eraserhead Press – strictly Bizarro

Starcherone Books – “independent innovative fiction”

Belladonna Publishing – “preferred genres are dark fantasy, urban fantasy, gothic, steampunk and fairytales.” They also do comics/graphic novels.

Weird Year – erm…weird stuff

Strange House Books  – horror, horror porn and everything gross in between

LegumeMan Books – absurdist and strange

Coffee House Press – “non-profit literary publisher”

The Dalkey Archive – literary

Dzanc Books – literary

Jaded Ibis Productions – literary and ‘narrative arts’

Les Figues – literary and ‘narrative arts’

Spuyten Dyvil – literary

Bizarre Book Club 6 – Adult Special (that means probably has rude bits in)

OK so most of the books featured in Bizarre Book Club shouldn’t be read by children, but it probably goes double for the ones featured here as parents don’t like their kids reading about full on rudeness or icky bits. I can understand it, that would be weird.

My face pretty much throughout Wetlands
My face pretty much throughout Wetlands

1. Wetlands by Charlotte Roche. This book is famous apparently, or rather infamous. Some say it’s feminist writing, others that it touches on mental illness. Whether it’s both, one or neither it did fascinate me and raised some interesting questions on our obsession with hygiene, especially feminine.

I agree with whoever said the anger was similar to JD Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye, and I also agree with the South Park episode in which they write a book called Scrotie Mcboogerballs. It is relentlessly and childishly disgusting and I rolled my eyes at several points, but I can’t pretend I didn’t read it very quickly.

2. House of Holes by Nicholson Baker. I dipped into this book rather than reading it straight through. I found it quite entertaining (and very daft) but wished it was even more surreal. I felt (and this is only personal opinion) that as it was in another world it could have been a lot more ‘out there.’

It’s set in a fantastical sexual holiday camp in which people can remove limbs or get friendly with trees, which was quite fun, however as it’s written by a man it’s very male focused. The descriptions for parts are quite amusing, but I won’t spoil it for you (I know I’m a tease).

3. The Juliette Society by Sasha Grey. I’m a fan of Sasha Grey, I think she’s an interesting lady. I enjoyed her novel despite the story line being a familiar one (a mysterious high society sex club). She mentions inspiration from Bunuel (Belle De Jour) and Kubrick among others and a lot of the fantasies, particularly one about a wardrobe, are very Lynchian. The title also comes from De Sade’s Juliette. I say stop worrying about where the story is going and just read it, it’s pretty.